Maybe You’re Doing It All Wrong on LinkedIn

So this is the part where I go from being a passive observer on LinkedIn to a semi ballistic panda because “oh shoot, someone is selling some career snake oil on the platform again and I have to do something about it”.

I stumbled upon this post on the networking platform this morning:

 

I’m not against using these “persuasion principles”. In fact, it’s part of what I do as a copywriter where I persuade people via the written word.

Sure, you’ll “achieve your desired results” from your network by liking their posts or endorsing them for skills (which, by the way, you know nothing about because you haven’t really worked with them in the first place).

It’s a simple formula: I give you X so I expect you to give me X in return.

However, citing these so-called principles are giving readers the wrong impression. I’m fairly sure that the relationships you build from these so-called strategies won’t have solid pillars to stand on.

Before you spend countless hours doing all of these persuasion tactics, have you thought about the specific set of solutions that you bring to the table? 

What SPECIFIC VALUE do you offer? 

The problem with most of us (I am no exception!) is we expect results right away.

As a result, we tend to forget the most important thing when it comes to building work relationships: helping a brand or business solve their problem. 

You can’t help these folks fix their business woes without knowing how your skills will fit into the equation.

The first step is knowing whether or not you’re the right person who can help.

So you do digital marketing? Or graphic design?
Perhaps you’re a UX unicorn. Or you’re probably a senior web developer with a decade’s worth of experience.

But all of these are not solutions, they are merely broad skills and experiences. Instead, identify which skills of yours can help solve a business or brand’s problem.

Missing this first step explains why a lot of people are disheartened about LinkedIn, lamenting how the networking platform is not working for them.

You can’t effectively sell your services and skills to recruiters and clients when you don’t even know your Unique Value Proposition.

Take a moment to reflect on the specific skillset that you bring to the table.

If you think you’re lacking one, learn something new. Once you’re sure about the value you offer, use those persuasion tactics by all means!

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